The evolution of Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 to Web 3.0

The evolution of Web 1.0 to Web 2.0 to Web 3.0

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May 19, 2022 by Diana Ambolis
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Web 1.0, Web 2.0, and Web 3.0 are significant milestones in the Internet’s evolution. Understanding the similarities and distinctions between these technologies is akin to comprehending our past, present, and future selves. These concepts are rarely thoroughly defined, despite their importance. You’ll quickly understand why these changes are so significant and what they represent for
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Web 1.0, Web 2.0, and Web 3.0 are significant milestones in the Internet’s evolution. Understanding the similarities and distinctions between these technologies is akin to comprehending our past, present, and future selves. These concepts are rarely thoroughly defined, despite their importance. You’ll quickly understand why these changes are so significant and what they represent for the future.

In a Nutshell: The Difference Between Web 1.0 2.0 3.0

The static text and graphics that defined Web 1.0. Visual adornments and interactivity were rare on Web 1.0 pages. All of this changed with Web 2.0, which made websites more interactive. It was primarily defined by the capacity of users to engage with the material and other users on a website. APIs make it simpler to incorporate code into websites. The majority of site material was migrated to enormous parallel databases in Web 3.0. AI and semantic technology allow computers to work with data more freely. This also makes it easier for systems to link the Web with metaverse-based implementations using 3D approaches.

What Is Web 3.0? The Future of the Internet

Let’s take a closer look at Web 1.0.

It’s important to remember how basic the Internet was in its early days. There was more revolution than progress between Web 1.0, Web 2.0, and Web 3.0. Web 1.0 resembles what is used now. However, this resemblance is simply superficial.

HTML is used in Web 1.0, Web 2.0, and Web 3.0. (Hypertext Markup Language). HTML is frequently created on the fly by servers in Web 2.0 and Web 3.0. However, all of the HTML in Web 1.0 was hand-coded, using only a small part of HTML.

Web 1.0 HTML did not include the cascade-style scripting that we have today. Coders could only use ambiguous phrases like CENTER or RIGHT to align images and embedded components; otherwise, Web 1.0 blended text with sloppy embedded media. Even video streaming required proprietary third-party plugins such as Quicktime or Realplayer.

Web 1.0 Characteristics

Web 1.0 is characterized by four primary characteristics. The first is that web pages are static, meaning they are unaffected by scripts or external operations. Second, the site’s static nature is reinforced by the fact that the HTML really just files on a server. This is equivalent to text files in a computer directory.

Additionally, due to server-side inclusions or CGI, the files may appear non-static (Common Gateway Interface). However, these are simply links to data from other files, such as citations. Finally, page layout in Web 1.0 is provided through frames and tables and rough placement tags.

Let’s take a closer look at Web 2.0

Web 2.0 sites are always evolving. Pages that were static in the face of both users and servers defined Web 1.0. Web 2.0 is mostly defined by dynamic engagement.

Users can make modifications by clicking dynamic components or leaving comments. Other changes are caused by the server pulling data from distant databases or APIs. CSS (cascading style sheets), Javascript, and other scripting systems provide even more modifications. These scripting systems also spawned full-fledged web applications. These are Web 2.0 sites that offer features that are generally only available in desktop programs.

Much of this is made feasible by the increasing power of servers, personal computers, and mobile devices. Servers improved their ability to load data from databases tens of thousands of times per second. Web browsers may run scripting languages that could rewrite content dynamically. In order to manage all of this, internet speeds were also raised.

Web 2.0 Characteristics

Web 2.0 is distinguished from Web 1.0 by four significant characteristics. The first is that Web 2.0 allows users to sort information without regard to individual server files. Second, user involvement can update the site’s content in real-time. The third aspect is that, while site conversations aren’t required, they can easily be activated. The fourth characteristic of Web 2.0 is the use of code blocks in APIs. Finally, it’s critical to remember emergent features. Because of the increased interactivity and ease of use, communities grew up around specific websites.

Let’s take a closer look at Web 3.0.

The way servers use the information in their databases is one of the most fundamental developments in Web 3.0. In order to provide a more dynamic version of the Internet, information was dynamically inserted or withdrawn from databases in version 2.0. 3.0, on the other hand, has a more human-like relationship with data.

Humans keep track of memories and use our intelligence to manipulate them. Web 3.0 envisions computers not only storing but also comprehending data. Prior to this, computers were essentially data storage devices that had no idea what most of it meant to human readers. Machines have become powerful enough to understand what’s in their databanks, thanks to Web 3.0.

3.0 also marks the beginning of mapping data and users into 3D views. This opens up the option of utilizing it through VR or other metaverse access points. 3.0 is a physical universe of live data in many aspects.

Web 3.0 Characteristics

Web 3.0 is known for its semantic processing. This is how computers interpret the text to determine its true meaning. Another feature of 3.0 is artificial intelligence, which enables this. Connectivity across numerous nodes helps with both of these. Distributed processing allows computers to think more like humans.

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The next feature of Web 3.0 is 3D capabilities. This can be used to describe data stored in three-dimensional arrays. In order to implement the metaverse, that knowledge can also be placed out in 3D landscapes. Finally, all of this is available on a variety of platforms.