CloneX NFTs And The Secret To Nike And RTFKT’s Success

CloneX NFTs And The Secret To Nike And RTFKT’s Success

NFT
January 25, 2023 by Diana Ambolis
94
The most devoted followers of the shoe and apparel company were completely unaware of Nike’s announcement in late 2021 that it had bought Web3 content creator RTFKT Studios. But the larger Web3 community paid attention, especially those who were paying attention to the NFT space. Nike made it obvious with this new acquisition that it
CloneX NFTs And The Secret To Nike And RTFKT’s Success

The most devoted followers of the shoe and apparel company were completely unaware of Nike’s announcement in late 2021 that it had bought Web3 content creator RTFKT Studios. But the larger Web3 community paid attention, especially those who were paying attention to the NFT space. Nike made it obvious with this new acquisition that it intended to make a name for itself in the metaverse. NFTs are the first step toward that grand objective. The NFT community as a whole was able to welcome this new project CloneX NFT with open arms because of a number of elements coming together.

Today, it appears as though Nike may replicate its in-person cultural capital on Web3 thanks to the quickly expanding CloneX NFT line that debuted in November 2021. CloneX’s validity appears to be everything but exaggerated, despite the excitement that Nike and RTFKT have been creating through their multiple NFT drops over the past few months.

Nike’s current position in NFTs

Legacy brands, especially luxury ones, frequently make a big entrance into this new market. Nike hasn’t been an exception, as can be seen by the number of drops RTFKT, a recent acquisition, has been releasing. Even though the new duo dropped their debut NFT in February 2022, their finest work remained to be done.

RTFKT’s launched the CryptoKicks NFT collection in April 2022, bringing virtual, fully licenced Nike sneakers to the NFT market. Given the highly speculative turn that sneaker culture has recently taken, it stands to reason that there is an increasing amount of interaction between sneakerheads and NFT devotees.

In appreciation of the crossover, Nike purchased RTFKT along with its CloneX NFT avatar line, which debuted a month prior to the announcement of the acquisition.

A CloneX NFT, though, just what is it?

Let’s begin by defining what CloneX isn’t. Contrary to what you may assume from Google search results, the CloneX brand refers to more than just a company that makes rooting gels, cloning solutions, and other industrial solvents. It is also a compilation of NFT.

The 20,000 3D avatar NFTs in Nike and RTFKT’s CloneX NFT collection, also known as “Clones,” were each created with a particular goal in mind. Since the collection is the first component of Nike and RTFKT’s envisioned metaverse ecosystem, each Clone in it is turnkey and prepared for the metaverse from the start.

I’m in. How, then, do I purchase a CloneX NFT?

Currently, browsing OpenSea is the most effective way to find a Clone of your own. The collection now has a floor price of 6.4 ETH or around $8,500 based on recent prices. Even if you could try to acquire a piece of a Clone to get in, you might not be able to use all the utilities designed for these NFTs. You’ll only have to make an investment.

A comprehensive selection

But the functionality that CloneX’s creators have in mind for it isn’t what makes it genuinely unique. CloneX advances the NFT industry by giving as many various types of people as feasible the appropriate NFT avatars to serve as their representations in the virtual world. Beyond only race and biological sex, the CloneX team has infused its collection with a high level of inclusivity.

The 20,000 CloneX NFT avatars can be divided into eight different “DNA kinds” or subtypes. Humans make up around half of all CloneX NFTs, followed by robots, who make up about three-tenths, and angels, demons, reptiles, and undead, who make up about two-tenths of the entire supply. A small percentage of people with the Human CloneX DNA type has the “vitiligo” feature; this is the same skin condition that caused Michael Jackson to wear gloves during the 1980s and bleached skin for the rest of his life. But unlike the late King of Pop, CloneX NFTs with Vitiligo skins will flaunt them loudly and proudly—possibly as a small form of affirmation for any CloneX owners who need that little bit of extra encouragement to feel at ease in their own skin.

If you’re keeping track, you’ll see that we’ve only mentioned six different DNA kinds thus far. Keep reading because we kept the two most uncommon DNA types from the CloneX collection for last.

Also, read – Top Twelve Different Examples of Brands Within the Metaverse

Most rare clones

Let’s begin with Murakami imitators. Not the depressing existentialist Murakami. Takashi Murakami, a rising star in Japanese pop art, is the topic at hand. The artist single-handedly transformed the project’s reputation from an “excellent NFT project” into a “possible funnel for widespread NFT adoption” when he worked with the Clone X team for a drop in late 2021.

In an interview with Hypebeast, Murakami disclosed that he worked with the CloneX team to create qualities for numerous more generative PFP avatar NFTs that would be added to the initial 20,000. These traits represented eyes, mouths, helmets, and outfits.

Murakami clones were subsequently added as an entirely new DNA subtype to the Clone pool to assist in celebrating the iconic artist’s contribution. Only 0.5 per cent of the present crop of Clone NFTs are these prestigious Clones.

The most costly Clone to date had a Murakami DNA subtype as of this writing. Late in 2021, CloneX #4594 was sold on OpenSea for 450 ETH, which, as of this writing, is equivalent to around $600,000.

Despite this, the second-rarest DNA subtype in the dataset is Murakami Clones. The Alien DNA subtype has earned that distinction. The most expensive Alien Clone will sell for 88.88 ETH in December 2021, and just 0.15 percent of all Clones in circulation have this DNA subtype.