Honeywell Adds Granularity to Aircraft Parts Blockchain

Honeywell Adds Granularity to Aircraft Parts Blockchain

Blockchain
August 6, 2020 Editor's Desk
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Honeywell Aerospace started a blockchain to help its GoDirect Trade online portal for aircraft parts, in 2018. Airlines must keep records of the maintenance of all aircraft parts, no matter where in the world the work is performed. The first emphasis of Honeywell’s blockchain stored PDF documents and references to the digital aircraft record. Although
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Honeywell Aerospace started a blockchain to help its GoDirect Trade online portal for aircraft parts, in 2018. Airlines must keep records of the maintenance of all aircraft parts, no matter where in the world the work is performed.

The first emphasis of Honeywell’s blockchain stored PDF documents and references to the digital aircraft record. Although at the outset, the company designed to extract the data from the PDF and save the individual elements allowing it to be fully searchable. There are blockchain initiatives from SITA, the U.S. Navy, and GE Aviation, amongst others.

Honeywell Announcement

For decades, aerospace companies and their consumers have sunk in cumbersome documentation processes and storage mechanisms. Honeywell is resolving those problems by completely combining aircraft record generation into its digital blockchain ledger. This offers Honeywell’s consumers with an easy way to examine and recover scattered data by a simple user interface, building a speed and efficiency level never before accessible in the aerospace industry. 

Quick and easy access to this data is crucial for airlines because most employ dozens of repair facilities, and the paperwork from each is not integrated. Additionally, airlines and operators generally deal with lost, printed paperwork associated with a part. This paperwork, or “trace documents,” is critical to preserving the value of a part’s worth.

Honeywell’s blockchain is a secure, decentralized database crowd-sourced by all its approved users. Each user that Honeywell provides has a copy of the database and identifies its contents in real-time. Instead of saving only PDF documents or a reference to the digital aircraft record, Honeywell instantly stores the actual form data “on-chain.” This data is utilized to re-construct aircraft records, including records that document the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration has certified that aircraft parts are safe to fly. Consumers can access these records, and in the case where paperwork is missing, customers can input the part number. Serial number and the user interface will recover the data from the blockchain and “rebuild” the lost document.

In its purest form, blockchain technology builds trust between all parties on the chain by digital transparency. The company’s goal is not to be the only aerospace company building unified aircraft records on chain, but rather to associate and be an implementation ally so others can leverage the same technology.

Adding data to the blockchain ledger does not substitute regulatory authorities’ prevailing document requirements, but rather enhances them more efficiently. Honeywell now unpacks all that parts and repair data and makes it immutable, searchable, and accessible to everyone in its permissions-based ecosystem.

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