NFT Industry Have To Take Comic NFTs Seriously In Coming Years

NFT Industry Have To Take Comic NFTs Seriously In Coming Years

NFT
November 22, 2022 by Diana Ambolis
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The comedy industry has traditionally adhered to the same regulations as it is a part of the entertainment industry. As a result, the obstacles that aspiring comics must overcome are quite similar to those that aspiring actors and singers must overcome. The “big break” comedians yearn for might be a seat on that season’s cast
NFT Industry Have To Take Comic NFTs Seriously In Coming Years

The comedy industry has traditionally adhered to the same regulations as it is a part of the entertainment industry. As a result, the obstacles that aspiring comics must overcome are quite similar to those that aspiring actors and singers must overcome. The “big break” comedians yearn for might be a seat on that season’s cast of Saturday Night Live or a part in a budding filmmaker or writer’s innovative new comedy for the younger crowd. Now they are entering the world of Non-fungible tokens in the form of Comic NFTs.

But what if comedians didn’t require a significant sabbatical to launch their dream careers? What if these possibilities were not a requirement for a successful career but rather the icing on the cake?

How Comic NFTs can help in this situation

The primary problems with the current state of comics

Let’s start by looking at the comedians’ existing environment. According to a 2018 claim made by The Hollywood Reporter, comedians on the Los Angeles comedy club circuit could earn “anything from $1,250 to $2,000 per week.” Wow! That’s quite admirable. However, the such allegation was far from what the typical LA comedian at the time had said.

Vulture went down with a different group of LA comedians to gain a more accurate understanding of the typical comedian’s income in order to deconstruct this alleged “comedy gold rush.” Unsurprisingly, they discovered that the majority of comedians in the scene didn’t earn six-figure salaries. Ian Karmel, an Emmy nominee, even went so far as to claim that he had made “maybe $500 total doing stand-up in Los Angeles.”

That is very different from the fictionalized version of Jerry Seinfeld’s life that we saw in the 1990s. The majority of comedians just do not make enough money from events to support themselves. Comedians often need to diversify their sources of income, just like the majority of other creatives.

An excellent and preferred technique of interaction above heckling

Would you like to help with a comic you appreciate? To achieve that, you can now purchase comic NFTs. To give fans more interesting and meaningful opportunities to interact with their favorite entertainers, Jambb and its intended decentralized entertainment network have collaborated with performers from a variety of genres, including comedy. For instance, Hannibal Burress was the star of a few Non-Fungible Jokin’ comedy programs in 2021. Those clips were made accessible on Jambb’s NFT market.

Users of the app can amass complete collections of digital memorabilia for their preferred up-and-coming comedians. Particularly tidbits of their act, podcasts, and even privileged access to previously unreleased specials. Jamb’s innovative approach—which focuses on assisting users in minting and gathering NFTs of their favorite comedy routines and specials—could support aspiring young comics financially as they begin their careers.

Repairing a faulty model

YouTube is renowned for, among other things, decreasing the entry barrier for video artists, particularly comic book creators. The video-sharing website has been dominated by comedy skits since it launched in 2005. Content from creators like ProZD, CalebCity, Joel Haver, and a long list of others frequently receives millions of views. But there’s a problem: YouTube’s monetization model favors content producers for uploading longer-form videos because this format is more likely to generate advertising income (which is how creators get their cut). However, comic NFTs might get over this obstacle, making it possible for anyone with even the slightest sense of humor to pursue their dream of being a comedian.

Not much better is TikTok. Although the platform may open up a plethora of branding and partnership opportunities for you, it can be a bit finicky about how much it pays its creators. You recently received a million views on TikTok. Here it is $20. Be a nut.

That’s not to argue that prosperous creators on these platforms can’t support themselves in any case. However, the road to success undoubtedly requires good fortune, particularly in the shape of an algorithmic favor. So what are comedians who are still traveling that path to do? Entering NFTs might be a place to start.

Comic NFTs are non-transferable humor

Humor is highly regarded throughout the larger NFT community, just like it is everywhere else online. After all, during the difficult initial months of the crypto bear market, humor kept the community together. During this time, a rush of ludicrous projects, like Goblintown, a new fixture of the NFT community, filled OpenSea’s charts.

Even some prominent members of the comedic world in the NFT community have created groups centered on their comedic tastes and general perspectives on the expanding field. Kmoney frequently uses comedic video skits on Twitter to express the community’s opinions regarding current events in between hosting shifts at Rug radio. Leah Lamarr, a stand-up comedian, has achieved similar success in the industry thanks to her appearances as guests on the Web3 game show Internet Game and her selection as 2021 entertainer of the year by TIMEPieces x Robotos. She is currently on a comedy tour titled after the technology as a thank-you for the friendly reception she received from the NFT community.

Comic NFTs and the accompanying community are steadily establishing themselves as yet another option to the standard path for new comedy careers for comedians. You can develop an audience through social media, for sure. However, in Web3? Even the tiniest comedians have a chance to establish a genuine community.