Why reusing Bitcoin Address can lead to private key theft?

Why reusing Bitcoin Address can lead to private key theft?

Bitcoin News
July 7, 2022 by Diana Ambolis
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What is Bitcoin Address? Similar to sending and getting mail through a mailbox, you must be able to send and receive your funds from a specific place in order to buy or sell products using Bitcoin. The site where you send and receive Bitcoins is actually on the internet and is represented by a lengthy
A Discussion on Bitcoin's Potential with Andreas M. Antonopoulos

What is Bitcoin Address?

Similar to sending and getting mail through a mailbox, you must be able to send and receive your funds from a specific place in order to buy or sell products using Bitcoin.

The site where you send and receive Bitcoins is actually on the internet and is represented by a lengthy string of letters and numbers since we’re talking about sending and getting bitcoins and not postcards.

The term for it is a Bitcoin address.

Bitcoin payment is indicated by its address. Like sending an email, you would send bitcoins to your friend from your Bitcoin address to their Bitcoin address if you wanted to send them money.

However, the majority of blockchain experts advise creating a new Bitcoin address each time you transfer or receive money. Thanks to this personal security safeguard, it is more difficult for people to track where your Bitcoin funds originate and end.

Discovering a Bitcoin Address

After downloading the Bitcoin wallet, which is software that enables you to securely transmit, receive, and store Bitcoin funds in the Bitcoin network, in order to obtain the address of Bitcoin. Your private key is your bitcoin password, which is also kept in bitcoin wallets. Every time you create an invoice or request for Bitcoins, the software will generate a fresh Bitcoin address for you.

Also, read – Everything you need to know about Crypto Gambling

What is a Private key?

A private key acts as a password and gives you access to and control over your cryptocurrency cash.

When you first purchase cryptocurrencies, you are given two keys: a public key that functions similarly to an email address (enabling you to send and receive money safely with others) and a private key, which is often a string of letters and numbers (and which is not to be shared with anyone). Your money is safe and can be managed everywhere there is an internet connection as long as you — and only you — have access to your private key.

What makes private keys crucial?

One cryptographic advance that makes digital money viable and secure is the system of public and private keys.

Cryptocurrencies are decentralized, which means a bank or any other entity does not hold your digital money in the middle. Instead, a system known as a blockchain uses a network of computers to distribute your cryptocurrency. Cryptocurrency blockchains can be open, allowing anyone to view all public key and transaction data.

Why reusing Bitcoin Address can lead to private key theft?

The hosts of “Bitcoin, Explained,” Aaron van Wirdum and Sjors Provoost, talk about reusing Bitcoin addresses in this episode. They go into more detail on the drawbacks of reusing Bitcoin addresses.

For basically three reasons, it is not a good idea to reuse Bitcoin addresses. The first two of these are that it impairs privacy and hinders Bitcoin’s ability to withstand censorship. In the episode, Van Wirdum and Provoost discuss a few instances of how such a loss of privacy and censorship resistance can adversely impact bitcoin users.
Reusing Bitcoin addresses is unwise for a third reason: it leaves room for some specialized assaults. Attackers might be able to obtain private keys from signatures in some circumstances after coins have been sent to an address for the first time. However, this scenario calls for a wallet to have incorrectly implemented the signing process in the first place. In some cases, if addresses are reused, quantum computers might be able to extract secret keys from signatures.

Timing side-channel attacks, such as the newly publicized “Hertzbleed Attack,” are another sort of specialty attack. Attackers may be able to obtain a private key from a wallet by carefully observing how the computer that houses the wallet acts when signing a transaction, according to Provoost. If addresses are reused, this attack is more likely to succeed.

Users of bitcoin should avoid utilizing addresses more than once for the reasons outlined in the examples above. Reusing addresses compromises user privacy and raises the possibility of a Hertzbleed Attack.